Little Black Cormorant can breed at any time in the year, according to weather conditions and food resources. The little black cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. Part B. It forages singly or sometimes in loose groups in lowland freshwater bodies, including small ponds, large lakes, streams and sometimes coastal estuaries. Photo: Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains NSW [7], https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Little_black_cormorant&oldid=984832528, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 22 October 2020, at 11:10. The little cormorant (Microcarbo niger) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. Little Black Cormorants may be distinguished from Great Cormorants, the other all black cormorant species in South Australia, by their small size, proportionately longer tail, thin bill and absence of coloured skin about the face. The common name in New Zealand is the little black shag. The Little Black Cormorant is one of only two totally black cormorants in Australia, with the other being the much larger (70 cm - 90 cm)Great Cormorant, P. carbo, which has a yellow bill, face and throat and a white chin. : Medium to large (45 cm to 60 cm e.g. A field study at two storage lakes, Lake Cargelligo and Lake Brewster, in south-western New South Wales found that the introduced common carp made up over half of its food intake. The little black cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds.It is common in smaller rivers and lakes throughout most areas of Australia and northern New Zealand, where it is known as the little black shag.It is around sixty centimetres long, and is all black … It is widely distributed across the Indian Subcontinentand extends east to Java, where it is sometimes called the Javanese cormorant. Photo: Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains NSW. Vol. As their feathers are not waterproof, cormorants are regularly seen perched with their wings outstretched to dry after fishing. Like other cormorants, it is often found perched on a … Three to five (rarely six or seven) pale blue oval eggs measuring 48 x 32 mm are laid. 1. Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds. We can find some few birds, but also up to 1000 pairs. Much smaller than Great Cormorant, and lacks that species’ yellow/white face. The Little Black Cormorant is found throughout Australia, including Tasmania. In the breeding season, adults have fine white flecks on the head and neck and the green tinge becomes more bronze. The Little Black Cormorant has a large breeding range that exceeds 2 million square kilometers. The little black cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. This species congregates in larger flocks than other cormorants and flies in V-shaped formations. Photo: Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains NSW. The Great Cormorant also flies more often in long lines than in V-shaped formations. Breeding in … Nomadic, leaving coastal habitats when inland waters are plentiful. The back has a greenish sheen. The Little Black Cormorant feeds on fish, crustaceans and aquatic insects. Often forms large flocks both in the air and while foraging on the water. The Little Black Cormorant nests colonially, often on the fringes of heron or ibis colonies, building large stick nests in the fork of a tree or on the ground. The underparts are a uniform glossy black. Immature birds have brown and black plumage. It is common in smaller rivers and lakes throughout most areas of Australia and northern New Zealand, where it is known as the little black shag. This species congregates in larger flocks than other cormorants and flies in V-shaped formations. Slightly smaller than the Indian cormorant it lacks a peaked head and has a shorter beak. The Little Black Cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. Its specific epithet is derived from the Latin words sulcus "groove", and rostrum "bill". [2] It is a predominantly freshwater species, found in bodies of water inland and occasionally sheltered coastal areas.