The version I purchased included a hard carrying case, illuminated reticle finderscope, and a diagonal. Even the slightest breeze would jiggle my bulky Schmidt-Newtonian, thereby ruining my current 3-minute exposure. The fine-tuning knob was something I had never used before, and at this point, I could tell that this telescope was made for astrophotography. You’re much better off loosening the compression ring attaching your camera, rotating the camera and tightening it back up than you are using this feature. This is a rather sweet deal! You won’t regret it. On paper, this looks like a great telescope that delivers all that’s required for both visual and photographic use. While I highly recommend this scope, I would encourage that if you can afford the extra 300 USD, the 102mm version is a much better buy and the issues I’ve pointed out with this scope aren’t present on the larger model. Everything was solid out of the box. Its specs are quite impressive. This refractor is incredibly portable. The faster f/6 optics of this triplet design offer advantages in terms of both physical size and the potential field of view. The high-quality glass design of an apochromatic refractor reminds me of a high-end telephoto camera lens. The carbon fibre construction not only looks great, but is extremely lightweight for something so large, weighing in at about the same as the 1.25 diagonal that came with my Meade LX90. The dual-speed, Crayford-style focuser is ultra-solid and tightly locks my DSLR camera into place while imaging. The faster f/6 optics of this triplet design offer advantages in terms of both physical size and the potential field of view. Complete Astrophotography Equipment Setup for Deep-Sky Imaging, AstroBackyard | Astrophotography Tips and Tutorials 2020. The real reason I decided on this telescope was its superb photography potential. One thing to note is that if you want to use this scope for photography, a coma corrector / field flattener is a must. I highly recommend the ED80 to beginner to intermediate astrophotographers looking for the highest possible image quality at an affordable price. Coupled to the right eyepiece or camera the 480mm focal length of this instrument will yield a five degree field of … The visual performance of this scope is excellent, especially when viewing bright planets or the moon. When I first began taking pictures of deep-sky objects through my telescope, they were shaky images with bloated football stars and poor focus. At f/6, I was delighted with the amount of light I was able to capture in a 3-minute exposure with the modest 80mm objective. Explore Scientific ED80 Review When I first began taking pictures of deep-sky objects through my telescope, they were shaky images with bloated football stars and poor focus. My early deep sky images using an Explore Scientific ED80 Triplet APO. On most nights, I’ll have my DSLR attached, focused, and ready to image in less than 10 minutes. You won’t be disappointed. Shooting the moon with my Explore Scientific ED80 and Nikon D750 on my Celestron AVX. I’m used to seeing the planets with my 8 SCT and my older 120mm f/5 achromatic refractor. I own a Twilight II mount and enjoy using it with various small refractors and my 6-inch f/4 Newtonian reflector. This scope’s small size and weight make it an ideal “grab and go” scope. This also means that even a modest tracking mount will have no trouble handling the weight of the telescope, along with all of the camera gear needed for astrophotography. This is a beginner’s review of the Explore Scientific ED80 Triplet and a few assorted accessories. Genuine ED glass from Hoya Japan is used on all ED APO Triplets at Explore. This experience left me discouraged, and in search of a telescope that was designed for my astrophotography needs. The Explore Scientific Essential Series ED80 (model # ES-ED0806-01) delivers the goods with solid construction and great optics. It has a few shortcomings and compromises that keep its price affordable, but overall, this fine instrument will fulfil the needs of the most demanding photographer without breaking the bank in the process. Deep sky objects within its reach show fantastic contrast. Explore Scientific ED APO 80mm f/6 Essential - part of the Explore Scientific Essential series. The Cassini division is clearly visible and some subtle banding is visible on the planet’s disc. This is one area where this scope definitely does not disappoint. Rather than attaching a separate bracket to hold this autoguiding telescope, I simply use the existing bracket that was designed to house the finderscope on the ED80. A refractor in the 60-100mm range generally offers an extremely wide field of view, which is great most of the time. - Small and lightweight aluminium construction, - Razor sharp optics with phenomenal colour, - Collapsable dew shield makes for a small size for transportation, - Focuser has an imprecise, “spongy” feel, - Meade finder scope mount makes attaching other finders impossible without replace the bracket, - Poor tolerances on some of the machining, This fine instrument delivers a lot of performance for it’s affordable price. It’s also extremely versatile, able to capture wide-field views spanning several degrees while also providing the high power punch to tease out lunar and planetary detail and split close double stars…" Tolerances for the machining here are very poor. This is a beginner’s review of the Explore Scientific ED80 Triplet and a few assorted accessories.