1992). willow Salix spp., oak Quercus spp. reedbeds) and scattered trees or srubs (del Hoyo et al. The Eurasian Spoonbill has been breeding at Smir heronry since two decades, but the breeding population has never exceeded 20 pairs. During winter, the birds migrate south to the tropics. Spoonbills have long, flattened beaks and moderately long necks. Justification of Red List CategoryThis species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The Eurasian Spoonbill differs from the African Spoonbill with which in overlaps in winter, in that the latter species has a red face and legs, and no crest. Eurasian spoonbills may frequently shelter marine habitats in the course of the winter corresponding to deltas, estuaries, tidal creeks, and coastal lagoons. 1992), and is especially affected by the disappearance of reed swamps due to agricultural and hydroelectric development (Hancock et al. The species usually nests in monospecific colonies or in small monospecific groups amidst mixed-species colonies (del Hoyo et al. In Europe, solely the Netherlands, Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Greece have sizeable populations. In the north of its range the species breeds in the local spring (e.g. They feed The species is threatened by the loss of wetland habitat. Fun Facts Eurasian spoonbills are silent by nature. The exception to this rule is the Roseate Spoonbill, which has pink feathers. 2008). 2008). The European population is estimated to be increasing (BirdLife International 2015). Your email address will not be published. In England it was historically referred to as the “shovelard”, a reputation later used for the Northern Shoveller. Trend justificationThe overall population trend is uncertain, as some populations are decreasing, while others are increasing or stable (Wetlands International 2015). It has a crest within the breeding season. 1992) (e.g. The Eurasian Spoonbill or Common Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia) is a wading bird of the ibis and spoonbill family Threskiornithidae, breeding in southern Eurasia from Spain to Japan, and also in North Africa. from April) however in tropical components of its range it instances breeding to coincide with rainfall. 1992) but may only travel short distances (Snow and Perrins 1998) while other populations are resident and nomadic or partially migratory (del Hoyo et al. It inhabits either fresh, brackish or saline (Hancock et al. chlorinated hydrocarbons) (Hancock et al. 3. Eurasian Spoonbill/Common Spoonbill A common spoonbill. BirdLife International (2020) Species factsheet: Platalea leucorodia. 1992), and often roosts communally up to 15 km away from feeding areas (Brown et al. It has a crest within the breeding season. Poaching and collisions with overhead electricity cables are the main non-natural causes of death during migration (Triplet et al. P. l. archeri. The bird is also found in North Africa. They are largely silent. For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern. 1992) of up to 100 individuals (Hancock et al. reedbeds) (del Hoyo et al. They also have long, featherless legs, which they use to wade through shallow waters. A feeding Spoonbill is a distinctive sight, even discounting the bird’s large size and white plumage, for few other birds place their bills in the water and sweep them, slightly open, in a wide arc from side to side again and again, strolling forwards all the while. 1992) (less than 30 cm deep) wetlands with mud, clay or fine sand substrates, generally avoiding waters with rocky substrates, thick vegetation or swift currents (Hancock et al. There are three subspecies: P. l. leucorodia, the nominate race, occupies all the range except as below. 1992), bushes, mangroves or deciduous trees (e.g. The bill has a yellow patch at the tip. Roseate Spoonbills get their pink color from their food! Purple Heron - Profile | Facts | Call | Habitat | Range | Diet, Least Bittern - Profile | Habitat | Sounds | Flying | Nest | Range, Great Egret – Profile | Habitat | Facts | Flight | Nest | Call, American Bittern Bird – Habitat | Range | Flight | Size | Migration, Least Bittern – Profile | Habitat | Sounds | Flying | Nest | Range, Eurasian Spoonbill – Profile | Facts | Range | Lifespan | Color, Purple Heron – Profile | Facts | Call | Habitat | Range | Diet. In Europe, solely The Netherlands, Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Greece have sizeable populations. Within colonies, neighboring nests are normally fairly shut collectively, not more than 1 or 2 m (3.3 or 6.6 ft) apart. The breeding fowl is all white aside from its darkish legs, a black bill with a yellow tip, and a yellow breast patch like a pelican. Before then, they nested here very irregularly, probably because people collected the eggs. Population justificationThe global population is estimated to number c.63,000-65,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2015). The Roseate Spoonbill is one of the newest birds to join the Birdorable family. 1992). Clark’s Grebe Bird – Profile | Facts | Habitat | Sound. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. Outside the breeding season, Eurasian spoonbills forage singly or in small flocks of as much as 100 individuals. This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20,000 km 2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population … 2. The nest is a platform of sticks and vegetation that is both constructed on the bottom on islands in lakes and rivers or in dense stands of reeds, bushes, mangroves, or deciduous bushes as much as 5 m (16 ft) above the bottom.